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UTMB: Living In Galveston

Posted by on Wednesday, August 19, 2015
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Galveston Island is recognized worldwide for its health care and medical research advances. Island residents have the peace of mind of knowing that the most advanced health care technologies and the best-trained medical staffs are easily accessible.

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB) is a major academic health center dedicated to improving the lives of others through health sciences education, clinical care and biomedical research.

Opened in 1891, UTMB combines a rich history of service with a forward-thinking spirit to define the future of health care nationally and internationally.

Its membership in the Texas Medical Center (TMC) formalizes the health care and biomedical research partnerships UTMB has forged with other TMC member institutions in the Galveston/Houston region.

UTMB’'s Health System provides comprehensive care through a growing network of campus- and community-based clinics, in its Galveston-based inpatient care complex and Level I trauma center, and in collaboration with clinical partners in mainland Galveston County and beyond. Areas of clinical excellence at UTMB include the Texas Transplant Center, burn care, women’s health, stroke care, cardiovascular services, geriatrics, metabolic disorders (including treatment for obesity and diabetes), and cancer.

With recent expansions, UTMB now has 80 clinics at more than 40 sites on Galveston Island and the mainland. Island clinics are moving back to the renovated Primary Care Pavilion, and the first phase of the John Sealy Hospital modernization, which includes a remodeled Comprehensive Maternity Center, Children’s Hospital and burn unit, is almost complete. New clinics in the rapidly growing League City area include the Specialty Care Center at Victory Lakes, the Multispecialty Center & Stark Diabetes Clinic and the Pediatric Specialty Care Clinic at Bay Colony. (

Construction is now complete on the new $438 million Jennie Sealy Hospital, which provides a real-world “classroom’’ for students, expand UTMB’s inpatient capacity and provide an optimal healing environment for patients and their families.

Medical research at UTMB delves into a broad range of promising topics that often have immediate application to patient care. Areas of research strength include infectious diseases; biodefense and vaccine development; cancer; aging; diabetes; neuroscience and neurological recovery; environ- mental health and asthma; and mo- lecular medicine, structural biology and proteomics. UTMB also is home to the Galveston National Laboratory, the first national lab of any kind in Texas and one of only two national bio- containment labs for the safe study of infectious threats to human health.

UTMB Researchers Develop New Candidate Vaccines Against The Plague

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have developed new potential vaccines that protect animals against the bacteria that causes the deadly plague. Read more.

The Kindness Project Is Causing a Positive Ripple Effect Across Galveston Island

If you ask Erin Toberman, it doesn’t cost anything to be kind and that act of kindness has a ripple effect on the entire community. Read more.

Strong Social Support Is Related to Shorter Stay in Inpatient Rehabilitation After Hospitalization

A recent study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston showed that patients with strong social support from family and friends spend less time in an inpatient rehabilitation facility. Read more. TV Streaming Apps Launch

The travel channel is now available in the Apple App Store for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, and Apple TV devices; the Amazon App Store for Amazon Fire devices; Google Play for Android devices, and soon to Roku Streaming TV & Media Players. Read more.

Female Mosquitoes Can Transmit Zika Virus to Their Eggs & Offspring

New research from The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston has shown that female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can pass the Zika virus to their eggs and offspring. Read more.

Digital Forms of Dating Violence Are On the Rise

Many teens experience physical or sexual abuse within their romantic relationships and now dating violence can also be perpetrated digitally by harassing, stalking or controlling a romantic partner via technology and social media. Read more.

UTMB Researchers Protect Against a Lethal Infection of Ebola Sudan 4 Days After Infection

Researchers at UTMB, in collaboration with Arbutus Biopharma Corporation, have protected nonhuman primates against Ebola Sudan four days following exposure to the virus. Read more.

Baby's Checkup and a Shot for Mom

A nearly $1.5 million grant will support a unique opportunity for young moms to get anti-cancer vaccine at baby’s appointments Read more.

UTMB Researchers Find That Common Culex Mosquito Does Not Carry Zika

UTMB researchers have found that the common Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito does not carry the Zika virus, according to the latest research by the Zika research team at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Read more.

A Zika Treatment Could Already Be on the Market

A drug to treat Zika virus infections could already exist and be available on the market, according to the latest research from scientists at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Read more.

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